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  You are in: Home > Middle East Studies > Water in the Middle East  
 

Water in the Middle East
Cooperation and Technological Solutions in the Jordan Valley

In the series:
Peace Politics in the Middle East

Edited by David Hambright, F. Jamil Ragep & Joseph Ginat

Joseph Ginat, a cultural-political anthropologist, was Vice President of International Relations and Research at Netanya Academic College. He was the author of Blood Revenge: Family Honor, Mediation, and Outcasting, and editor of Sussex Studies in Peace Politics in the Middle East, as well as numerous contributions to social anthropology in the field of Mormon studies, and Arab culture.

 


Water in the Middle East
presents historical and cross-cultural perspectives on water and conflict, prospects for future cooperation in the water arena among Middle Eastern countries, the political economy of water and technical solutions to water shortages in the Jordan Valley, and the relationships among water, agriculture, and environmental sustainability. Through case studies and essays, natural and social scientific water experts from Israel, Palestine, Jordan, and the United States examine

The role of water in Middle East conflicts and the possibility of regional solutions to water scarcity requiring cooperation among states
Long-term prospects of various aquifers and other fresh-water sources, including desalination; current and future environmental deterioration of water resources
Breakthroughs and developments increasing regional agricultural productivity, depending less on high-quality waters while turning to lower quality resources, such as recycled and brackish waters; alternatives to current water-usage patterns, particularly with regard to agriculture and the possibility of redirecting water to tourism and other economic sectors

While this book highlights the complexities pertaining to regional water scarcity and inequitable distribution, the contributors offer no definitive conclusions or facile solutions; yet there is a broad consensus that regional solutions to maximize water resources must be pursued even as desalination becomes more viable both from technical/economic standpoints. The continuing deterioration of existing water supplies in terms of quantity and quality mandate that any solution must be achieved within a political/social framework of peace, enlightened economic policies, and the application of technical solutions that take due account of environmental concerns.

Published in association with the University of Oklahoma Press


Foreword
HRH Prince El Hassan bin Talal of Jordan

Preface
David L.Boren, President of the University of Oklahoma

Acknowledgments

1 Introduction: Water – A Conduit for Peace
K. David Hambright, F. Jamil Ragep, and Joseph Ginat

PART I
Historical and Political Perspectives

2 The Jordan Valley’s Water: A Source of Conflict or a Basis for Peace
Moshe Ma‘oz
3 Historical Political Conflict of Jordan River Water Resources
Rateb Amro
4 Compliance with and Violations of the Unified/Johnston Plan for the Jordan Valley
Munther J. Haddadin
5 Water Resources Scarcity in West Africa: The Imperatives of Regional Cooperation
Aondover Tarhule

PART II
Management of Limited Resources

6 Is Joint Management of Israeli–Palestinian Aquifers Still Viable?
Eran Feitelson
7 The Southern West Bank Aquifer: Exploitation and Sustainability
David J. Scarpa
8 Groundwater Salinization in the Jordan Valley – Quo Vadis?
Akiva Flexer, Yaakov Anker, Lea Davidson, Eliyahu Rosenthal, Annat Yellin-Dror, and Joseph Gutman
9 Lake Kinneret and Water Supply in Israel: Ecological Limits to Operational Supply
K. David Hambright and Tamar Zohary

PART III
Water Economics

10 The Water Economy of Israel
Yoav Kislev
11 Current Water Provision and Allocation in Palestine
Alfred Abed Rabbo
12 The Peace Process and Water Supply in Jordan: Inter- and Trans-Boundary Border Projects
Mohammed Abudayyeh Matouq
13 An Economic Approach for Making the Most of Jordan’s Water
Mohammed Issa Taha Ali
14 Water: Casus Belli or Source of Cooperation?
Franklin M. Fisher
15 Water, Demography, and Future Economic Development in the Triangle: Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinian Territories
Onn Winckler

PART IV
A Role for Agriculture

16 High Income Innovative Crops and Optimal Fertigation System: The Solution for High Farm Income under Water Shortage in the Jordan Valley
Zvi Karchi
17 Protected Agriculture: A Regional Solution for Water Scarcity and Production of High-Value Crops in the Jordan Valley
Daniel J. Cantliffe
18 Postscript: Focusing on Peace – Building Trust and Understanding
Joseph Ginat and Matthew Chumchal

The Contributors
Index


Reviews to follow

 

Publication Details

 
Hardback ISBN:
978-1-84519-122-1
 
 
Page Extent / Format:
272 pp. / 229 x 152 mm
 
Release Date:
October 2005
  Illustrated:   No
 
Hardback Price:
£39.50
 
 

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