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Latin American Studies

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Spanish and Latin American Transitions to Democracy

 

He is the author of Reversal of Development in Argentina: Postwar Counter-revolutionary Policies and their Structural Consequences (Princeton University Press, 1987) [winner of the Hubert Herring Prize to the best book in Latin American studies]; Institutional Design in New Democracies: The Cases of Eastern Europe and Latin America (co-edited with Arend Lijphart, Westview Press, 1996); Globality and Multiple Modernities (co-edited with Luis Roniger, Sussex Academic, 2002); and a large number of articles and book chapters.

Raanan Rein is Professor of Spanish and Latin American History and the Director of the Institute for Latin American History and Culture at Tel Aviv University. He is the author of numerous books and articles in various languages, including The Franco–Perón Alliance: Relations Between Spain and Argentina, 1946–1955 (Pittsburgh, 1993; Madrid, 1995; Buenos Aires, 2003); In the Shadow of the Holocaust and the Inquisition: Israel’s Relations with Francoist Spain (Tel Aviv, 1995; Madrid, 1996; London, 1997); Argentina, Israel and the Jews (Buenos Aires, 2001; Tel Aviv, 2002; Bethesda, MD, 2003).


This volume compares the Spanish and Latin American “double transitions” to liberal democracy and an open-market economy. Spain’s transitions in the 1960s–1980s have become the paradigmatic case of successful institutional transformation, and thus the standard for the evaluation of the economic and political change in Latin America and Central/Eastern Europe in the 1980s and 1990s. Even though most Latin American countries have transformed their economies and polities in recent decades, and the outcomes of this transformation have been variable, few of these countries have so far established solid liberal democracies and dynamic open economies.

The essays in this book, written by distinguished specialists, examine the different trajectories in Spain and several nations in Latin America, and seek to explain the different outcomes. In the large recent literature on transitions, this is the first systematic comparison between Spain and the Latin American cases.


Hardback ISBN: 978-1-903900-73-4
Hardback Price: £55.00 / $67.50
Release Date: May 2005
   
Paperback ISBN: 978-1-84519-136-8
Paperback Price: £17.95 / $29.50
Release Date: January 2006
   
Page Extent / Format: 320 pp. / 229 x 152 mm
Illustrated: No
   

 



Preface Comparing Transitions in Spain and Latin America

Introduction Latin American Transitions in the Spanish Mirror
Carlos H. Waisman

Part I Institutional and Cultural Dimensions of the Spanish Transition
1 IMAGINED MEMORY AS THE WEIGHT OF THE PAST: POLITICALTRANSITIONS IN SPAIN
Enric Ucelay-Da Cal

2 KEY FACTORS TO UNDERSTAND THE SPANISH TRANSITION
José María Marín Arce

3 REGIONS, NATIONS AND NATIONALITIES: ON THE PROCESS OF TERRITORIAL IDENTITY-BUILDING DURING SPAIN’S DEMOCRATIC TRANSITION AND CONSOLIDATION
Xosé-Manoel Núñez

4 POLITICAL TRANSITION IN SPAIN: STATE AND BASQUE NATIONALISM
Ander Gurrutxaga Abad

5 DEMOCRACY AND TERRORISM IN SPAIN 101
Juan Avilés

6 BETWEEN PAST AND FUTURE: CHILDREN AND THE CONTEST OVER CULTURAL AND POLITICAL IDENTITY DURING THE SPANISH TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY (SALAMANCA 1977–1979)
Tamar Groves

Part II Institutional and Cultural Dimensions of the Latin American Transitions
7 REPRESENTATIVE DEMOCRACY AND EFFECTIVE INSTITUTIONS: DEMOCRATIC PRACTICE IN CONTEMPORARY LATIN AMERICA
Luis Roniger

8 BRAZIL: THE “SLOW, GRADUAL AND SECURE TRANSITION TO DEMOCRACY”
Dina Lida Kinoshita

9 TRANSITION AND DEMOCRATIC CONSTRUCTION IN POST-FUJIMORI PERU
Rafael Roncagliolo

10 HOW THE ARGENTINE MILITARY INVENTED HUMAN RIGHTS IN ARGENTINA
David Sheinin

11 EDUCATIONAL REFORMS IN TRANSITIONS TO DEMOCRACY: THE CASES OF CHILE, ARGENTINA AND PARAGUAY
Batia Siebzehner

The Contributors
Index


The first process of political change of the third wave opened up new terrain for analysis in the social sciences, later incorporating the experiences of central and Eastern Europe. The transitions to democracy from socialism eclipsed for a while the attention on development in Latin America. Here, the political and academic agenda had moved on to give priority to the question of democratic governability. The volume by Waisman and Rein revisits this process, and does so from three perspectives. It takes on a comparative view, it adds to the analysis of the lessons learnt from Europe in the decade starting from 1989, and it has the benefit of hindsight in terms of knowing that there was no turning back following the transitions in Spain and Latin America and that these processes evolved with considerable political success. No doubt this historical perspective contributes to the lucidity with which the book discusses the evolution of democratic process. Waisman, in this sense, introduces an innovative explanatory factor in the analysis which is undoubtedly significant in understanding the enormous differences between the Spanish and Latin American experiences.
Journal of Latin American Studies


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